How Long Does Oregano Take To Grow? [Full Guide]

If you’re thinking of growing oregano, how long does it take? Where do you start, and how do you help it grow fast and efficiently?

This article will answer all of those questions and more. First, we’ll talk about why you should grow oregano in the first place and what it’s used for. Then, we’ll discuss how big oregano grows.

Next, we’ll get more in-depth about how long oregano takes to grow from its seed germinating to reaching full maturity.

After, we’ll go over how you can help your oregano grow well and thrive before harvesting the plant. We’ll talk about when to harvest and how to harvest your oregano plant.

Finally, we’ll share the average lifespan of an oregano plant. 

Why Grow Oregano?

Oregano is a wonderful herb that’s low-maintenance to care for when growing. It’s also a hardy herb that can grow indoors or outdoors. In addition, it can stand a chance of surviving in colder weather.

Also, it’s a great flavor to add to your recipes or to use as a garnish on various dishes. For instance, oregano is a popular herb for Italian, Mexican, and Greek food. 

In a nutshell, oregano is a great plant to grow if you’re a beginner gardener. Also, you’ll get a lot of use out of it as a companion plant in your garden and for your various dinner ideas. 

How Big Does Oregano Grow?

Being a herb, oregano leaves are relatively small. However, the bush that they grow on can become quite big.

An oregano plant can grow up to two feet tall and two feet wide. So, it’ll take up a decent amount of room in your garden. Or you can plant it on its own in a pot either inside your house or outside.

You can learn more about how tall oregano grows here.

Oregano growing big
Oregano with flowers

How Long Does Oregano Take To Grow?

As with all plants, oregano takes time to grow. Plants grow in stages, from their seeds germinating to reaching their full maturity and preparing for harvest.

When planting the seeds, they need plenty of light to germinate. So, you can leave them uncovered, and they’ll germinate in about four days.

If you plant cuttings from another oregano plant, then that will take about four to five weeks for the roots to be about an inch long.

So, how long does it take for oregano to sprout?

From there, the plant will take at least 45 days to mature, which is when you can do your first harvest.

However, depending on its care, it may take the oregano plant anywhere between 80 and 90 days to reach its full maturity.

Tips To Help Oregano Grow As Fast As Possible

As long as you know how to plant and care for oregano plants properly, the herb will thrive and grow well. However, you can easily help the plant if you need it to grow faster.

When And Where To Plant Your Oregano Seeds

Did you know that you can begin planting your oregano indoors before transporting it to your outside garden?

Starting indoors is a great way to get your oregano plant started early. For instance, oregano doesn’t do well in the cold and the prime time to plant the seeds is after the last frost of the season.

If you plant your seeds inside, you can begin your oregano plant at least four weeks before the end of winter. Then, at the last frost, you can transport your oregano plant to your garden outside.

Also, you’ll want to space out your seeds evenly so that they don’t run into one another when their roots sprout.

For example, you’ll want to plant oregano seeds at least 12 inches apart. However, it’s best to space them out at 18 to 24 inches if you have the room.

Companion Planting For Oregano

Companion planting is when you place certain plants near each other in the garden that have similar growing conditions, or they’ll help one another grow well.

For example, oregano can help other plants in many ways by attracting pollinators or repelling pests with its scent.

Oregano can get along well with many other plants, and they can help the plants in your garden. But, on the other hand, many plants can help oregano in return.

For instance, other herbs, such as thyme, rosemary, and sage, are excellent companion plants for oregano.

You can learn more about companion planting for oregano plants here.

Lighting And Temperature For Oregano Plants

Oregano likes warmer temperatures. So, when planting the seeds, you want to make sure that the soil is at least 70 degrees F. This should be the temperature whether you plant your seeds inside first or plant them outside right off the bat.

In addition, oregano thrives on sunlight. So you’ll want to choose a spot in the garden that gets at least six to eight hours of sunlight every day.

During the winter, you can shield the plant with row covers or cold frames. Oregano is hardy but might not survive a harsh winter.

Read my full guide to what to do with your oregano in winter here.

Soil And Fertilizer For Oregano

Oregano prefers to have soil that’s more on the dry side. An ideal soil type is something sandy or loamy so that it drains well and doesn’t absorb too much water, but enough water to keep your oregano drinking and growing.

Also, make sure the pH levels of the soil are between 6.5 and 7.0. You can get a soil test kit from your local garden center to ensure the soil is healthy enough to help your oregano grow. 

You won’t need to worry about it when it comes to fertilizer. Oregano can grow well on its own without the help of fertilizer.

In fact, fertilizer can add extract nutrients to the soil, which might end up backfiring on your oregano plant.

Water For Oregano Plants

Oregano likes warmer temperatures, and they prefer to have dry, sandy-like soil. So, you won’t need to worry about watering your oregano often.

It’s easy to overwater your oregano plant accidentally. So, when you notice that the soil is bone dry (you can stick your finger in the soil to see how moist it is underneath), that’s when you can give your oregano a little drink.

However, you’ll only want to water enough to get it moist, not wet. 

Read my full guide to watering oregano here.

When To Harvest Oregano

Oregano is quick to harvest. When your plant is about four to six inches tall, then you can begin harvesting the leaves.

Your oregano is also ready to harvest right before the flowers bud on the plant. When you begin to see flowers sprouting, you can harvest the oregano plant. Also, if you want the oregano plant to continue harvesting, you can simply cut the flowers off.

You can also harvest and use the flowers. Read more here.

How To Harvest Oregano

Harvesting the oregano is easy enough. All you need is a pair of garden clippers or scissors and snip the stems of the leaves.

You can use them right away and harvest them as you need them. Or you can harvest the leaves regularly so that you can preserve the leaves or dry them out to use later.

In addition, you’ll be able to get many harvests from your oregano plant. You can snip as many stems and leaves as you want whenever you need them. Also, you can preserve them so you can leave room on the plant to grow more. 

How Long Does Oregano Last?

If you use oregano often enough, it’s worth it to plant your own. It’ll save you money from having to buy oregano at the store in the long run.

Oregano plants can survive for about five to six years as long as they’re cared for properly.

For the first year, you’ll be able to get one good harvest from it. Then, for every year after that, you’ll be able to harvest the oregano at least twice a year.

In other words, you can expect to get at least 9 to 11 harvests from your oregano plant. 

Final Words

Oregano is a great plant to grow for many. It’s low-maintenance enough that beginner gardeners can easily care for it.

In addition, its lifespan lasts a long time, and you’ll be able to get many harvests from it, saving you money from the grocery store. Also, you’ll be able to add rich flavors to your meals. 

If you plan accordingly, you can grow your oregano indoors and then bring it outside. Alternatively, you can grow it outside in the garden from the start or grow it inside all year round. 

Want to learn more? Click here to learn how to grow oregano from cuttings or here for the best companion plants for oregano. You can also find all my oregano guides here.